Latest News

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Unusual flocking behaviour in starlings in Israel

Watch the clip below for some fascinating footage of starlings flocking.

 

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Eagle-eyed hitchhiker

Read here about the young White-bellied Sea-eagle who hitched a ride on a hang glider at Stanwell Tops in NSW.

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Urban birds may use cigarettes as medicine

Research out of Mexico has uncovered the use of cigarette butts in the nests of urban birds. The chemicals in the cigarettes are thought to act as repellents to parasites that might harm nestlings. Read more about this interesting discovery here

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Position Available - BirdLife Discovery Centre Educator and Volunteer Coordinator

 

BirdLife Australia is looking for someone to provide environmental education activities and volunteer coordination at our Discovery Centre in Sydney Olympic Park, promoting BirdLife Australia objectives and maximising public support for the organisation.

Reporting to the Discovery Centre Manager, the postholder will be responsible for coordinating and delivering educational activities designed to engage both the general public of all ages and our volunteers in bird conservation. The postholder will also recruit, train and supervise volunteers at the Discovery Centre.

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Suburban trees save native birds

Research from Canberra has shown that streets with more than 30% native trees, had 11% more bird species of all types in them. See this Science Alert article for more info.

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Password protected nests

Our Superb Fairy-wrens are ingenious little creatures. New research has shown that, in an attempt to thwart Horsfield's Bronze Cuckoos (who lays their eggs in fairy-wren nests), the females have a particular note with a unique length and tone that the chicks must repeat in order to be fed. Read about how this amazing process works here.

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What citizen scientists provide

Citizen scientists contribute enormously to our understanding of Australia's birdlife. Here at Birds in Backyards we certainly appreciate everyone who submits surveys to us. Read this article that shows just how important citizen science is.

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Undone by rat cunning

Researchers at the University Of Sydney have shown how a rat's keen sense of smell and quick learning can be exploited to dramatically reduce their attacks on native birds.

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Raptor back in full flight

A young White-bellied Sea-Eagle has had a lucky escape in Tasmania. Click here for the full story.

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Crows react to threats in a human-like way

Research from the University of Washington has showed remarkable insight into the ability of crows to recognise faces and their association with positive and negative experiences. Read all about it here.

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Bid to save the Orange-bellied Parrot

Captive birds are expected to be released this summer in a bid to save the species. Click here for the full article.

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Citizen science is nothing new...

An interesting discussion about the value of citizen science: citizen science is nothing new and its value will only increase.

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Motorists place Powerful Owls in peril

Our Powerful Owl Project Officer, Dr. David Bain, comments in this article about the potential impacts that the latests spate of road fatalities may be having on the population of Powerful Owls on the north shore of Sydney: read the article here.

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How hungry birds use social media

Researchers from the Australian National University and Oxford University have found that Blue Tits, Great Tits and Marsh Tits use social networking to find out about the best food sources. Read more here.

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Sea Eagle takes Flying fox

News.com.au features an article and photograph series showing a White-bellied Sea Eagle capturing a flying fox in the middle of the Cairns CBD. The story and images are here.

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Bayside fossil is an ancient seabird

A 5 million year old fossil of a giant prehistoric bird has been discovered in Melbourne. The Pelagornis had a 5 metre wingspan and a serrated beak. read more about the discovery here.

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In search of the White-fronted Chat

According to Dr Richard Major, a research scientist at the Australian Museum (and member of the Birds in Backyards steering committee), about forty White-fronted Chats (Epthianura albifrons) would fit into a margarine tub.

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Finches 'personalities' shown by head colour

Research by Liverpool John Moores University and The Royal Veterinary College has found that Gouldian finches have different personalities depending on the colour of their heads. Read more about this research here.

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Bird-aircraft collisions on the rise

A new study suggests that birdstrikes by aircraft have increased by an average of 37% across all states since 2002. Read more here

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Global tragedy for birds

BirdLife Australia laments news of a dramatic increase in the risk of extinction for over 100 Amazonian birds. The new assessment is based on models projecting the extent and likely impact of deforestation across the Amazon.

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Cassowaries are bouncing back

When Cyclone Yasi crossed Australia's northeast coast last year, it cut a swathe through a large area of cassowary habitat. It put the already endangered, flightless birds at even more risk. However, more than a year on, the cassowaries are finally bouncing back. 

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Injured Wedge-tailed Eagle released in Tasmania

A Wedge-tailed Eagle in Tasmania that was deliberately shot nearly 12 months ago has been rehabilitated and released today. For the full story, go to the ABC website here.

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Volunteer needed: website support

Birds in Backyards is seeking a motivated volunteer to assist with the maintenance and support of its website.  We are seeking someone, preferably with Drupal CMS experience, to run module updates and to provide technical support to keep the site secure and functional. Responsibilities will include:

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Bowerbirds are great gardeners

Research published today has shown that Regent Bowerbirds are accidently growing flowers as a part of their mating ritual. Read about their findings at Australian Geographic and Live Science.

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