Welcome to Birds in Backyards

Birds in Backyards is a research, education and conservation program of BirdLife Australia focused on the birds that live where people live. Get involved by becoming a member and taking part in our online surveys. Learn how you can create bird-friendly spaces in your garden and local community. Find out more about Australian birds and their habitats.

Latest updates

Birds in Backyards is now using the BirdLife Australia login system. Click here to find out more.

The Birds in Backyards surveys are now available on Birdata. Click here to read more about the survey.

What's New

Birds are singing in the bright summer sun, head outdoors for some surveying fun! Conduct your Birds in Backyards Summer Survey on Birdata this December 2018 & January 2019.

Getting started is easy. If you don't have a Birdata account, sign up for one today.

Up to one billion birds strike glass in North America each year, and millions more hit windows each year around the globe, including across Australia. This is an enormous and heart-breaking number. But with your help, we can learn more about where and why it's happening, and work together to prevent one of the highest causes of bird injury and mortality.

The Birds in Backyards Program meets extraordinary people every day. Lea-Ann Leaden is a member of our wonderful community who has, over the last 6 years, been transforming her garden into a bird paradise. Lea-Ann agreed to answer some questions about what she has done in her garden, and why…

 

Why did you embark on creating a bird-friendly garden?

Landscape architect Melissa Stagg has a firm favourite in the bird world, and its just turned up at her place again for the first time this year. Read about her love of the Rainbow Bee-eater and what you can do in your space to help them (and other insectivorous birds), including creating a 'bug hotel'.

 

Bird strike is one of the highest causes of bird mortality globally and the rapid increase of urbanisation continues to exacerbate the damage caused by our buildings and other man-made infrastructure. Our homes, our places of work, where we study and where we relax all have a unique set of factors that put all species of birds at risk of window collisions.

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