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The spring is sprung, the grass is rizz, I wonder where the birdies is. I bet they’re in the garden. Conduct a survey this September & October and find out.

Begun in 1998, Birds in Backyards is celebrating its 20th year as a national citizen science program. Now that’s something to get excited about! Learn, participate, and create with us this year.

If you're a bird watcher, you may have noticed changes in your local bird population since the drought hit.

Inland bird populations are moving from their usual habitats to coastal areas in search of food and water.

Cities and coastal areas are now playing hosts to new species.

It's an exciting time for twitchers but a cause for concern too.

Eagles, hawks and other large birds of prey are flocking to cities and towns, with the drought forcing them out of the parched countryside, bird watchers say.

Data compiled by Birdlife Australia from citizen scientists has revealed large numbers of birds of prey are moving into urban areas.

Yes, I admit it, I am a bird nerd. It is a badge I wear with pride.

I am one of the very very fortunate few whose love of birds has translated into a paid job. Finding employment in an area you are passionate about it tough enough, let alone in this field so I am aware of just how lucky I am.

Springtime in the bird world means a flurry of breeding activity. Many birds are looking their best and advertising their attractiveness to potential mates with calls and displays. However whilst most birds follow the standard ‘find a mate, build a nest, lay eggs, raise young’ (with some slight variations), cuckoos do things a little differently.

Deakin University in Melbourne has been undertaking research to investigate Powerful Owl home range, spatial use and movement for three years. This current chapter of research is part of an overall 20+ year story to understand how this threatened species is coping with increasing urbanisation, and the management actions that can be undertaken to benefit powerful owls.

Up to one billion birds strike glass in North America each year, and millions more hit windows each year around the globe, including across Australia. This is an enormous and heart-breaking number. But with your help, we can learn more about where and why it's happening, and work together to prevent one of the highest causes of bird injury and mortality.

‘Where Song Began’ is a musical celebration of Australia’s birds and how they shaped the world. Performances in Sandgate and Brisbane with special guest speaker - author, Tim Low.

Australia's largest owl, the majestic and endangered powerful owl, is finding an unlikely home in the green areas of our city suburbs, and the Australian public is being called on to help track the nocturnal birds.

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