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Why not take advantage of the next sunny winter's day and submit a Birds in Backyards seasonal survey?

Up to one billion birds strike glass in North America each year, and millions more hit windows each year around the globe, including across Australia. This is an enormous and heart-breaking number. But with your help, we can learn more about where and why it's happening, and work together to prevent one of the highest causes of bird injury and mortality.

Begun in 1998, Birds in Backyards is celebrating its 20th year as a national citizen science program. Now that’s something to get excited about! Learn, participate, and create with us this year.

The huge bowers of golden bowerbirds are being used to monitor the impact of climate change. Researchers say the golden bowerbirds and other highland rainforest species are already being pushed to higher altitudes. They say more monitoring and adaptation research is needed to prevent some species becoming extinct.

The Queensland government has ticked off a crucial environmental approval for Adani’s Carmichael coalmine, bringing the contentious project a step closer to becoming reality.

Our Autumn survey stats are in and wow - a whopping 31621 birds were seen throughout the months of March and April coming in from 492 surveys and covering a total of 213 species.

 

North Queensland

As the weather cools down, breeding Powerful Owls all along the east coast are inspecting hollows and getting ready for another, hopefully bumper, breeding season. However this also means that birds are on the move, particularly juveniles, as they leave mum and dad and head out to explore the world on their own.

The artificial environment has now become so integral to the planet's surface it would be hard to imagine a time without it. Towering skyscrapers and apartment blocks dominate the skies of our major cities; houses of all shapes and sizes sprawl across our vast suburbs; a solid, unmoving presence among the fluidity of nature.

A group of birds that are not usually found in Australia attracted hundreds of birders to a relatively remote town on the north coast of NSW, resulting in a significant boost to the Australian economy.

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