A New Meaning for "Lawn"

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Woko
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A New Meaning for "Lawn"

Just a photo to show how indigenous understorey can be regenerated using minimum disturbance bushcare techniques. I've counted eleven understorey species in this patch. Weeds have been almost completely eradicated this summer although winter might show up a few. The seeds from these plants provide wonderful food for a variety of birds although I haven't seen any Diamond Firetails on the area. Yet. (See Surveys & Interesting Sightings/Back from the Brink).

Folk who are interested in attracting seed eating native birds could do worse than getting rid of their lawns & encouraging the regeneration of local native grasses & herbs. Lots of water could be saved, too, as the area in the photo has never been artificially watered. "Lawn" can be given a whole new meaning.

Woko
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Today I noticed two Diamond Firetails taking advantage of the seed in my restored patch. Whoopee!

oconnore51
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That is really great news.

elizabeth

Woko
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At least one is still around from what I heard this morning. I do hope the neighbour's marauding cats are being kept locked up. Fortunately, I haven't seen one for a while.

NateWinston
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Awesome news Dear!

Woko
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Dear?? Woko will do. 

Reflex
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Interesting post Woko.

We had a very dry winter this year (SE Qld) in the main despite having Cyclone Debbie. At one stage my lawn would be described as being orange or rusty in colour rather than green and literally crunched under foot. Because it was so dry it hardly grew at all and allowed me time off the mower which I really enjoyed but it also allowed some of the grasses to seed. I was amazed at the amount of Red-browed Finches and Double-barred Finches that appeared to feed on the seeds.Something that doesn't happen usually or to well maintained lawns as there are usually no seeds.

A very healthy looking Australian Magpie on my lawn showing just how dry it was. It is hard to believe this same lawn returned to green within a week of some decent rain.

Even the local Apostlebirds came for a feed.

Samford Valley Qld.

Woko
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Good ones, Reflex.

For the first time we've had Red-browed Finches in summer. They usually head for the cooler parts of the Mt Lofty Ranges in October. Not only that but they've bred 5 young ones! I often see these Finches feeding on the native grass seeds we now have in increasing abundance so I imagine that's why they're breeding & still around.

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