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How much bird life is there in your local area?

Are you an avid bird watcher or have you always wondered about the different species in your backyard?

What impact do bird seeds have on a bird's natural diet?

Check out a clip about the current plight of the Orange-belled Parrot that featured on the Project on the 16th of June. There are cameos from a couple of BirdLife Australia people.

http://tenplay.com.au/channel-ten/the-project/extra/season-6/orange-bellied-parrot-rescue
 

One of Australia's smallest birds has found a cunning way to protect its nest from predators by crying wolf, or rather hawk, and mimicking the warning calls of other birds.

Birds in Backyards is looking for a passionate environmental educator to join our team for between 3 and 6 months to work as an intern on our Birds in Schools project. A full position description is available for download on the right.

Applications close 19th June 2015.

 

 

It may be counterintuitive, but the sprawling necropolis Rookwood Cemetery is among the most thriving and exciting habitats for native animals in the Parramatta River stretch.

They were once seen in flocks of thousands. Now no more than 500 cover an area from central Queensland to southern Victoria. The Regent Honeyeater is one step away from extinction. Matthew Crawford joins a team in NE Victoria releasing birds following a successful captive breeding program at Taronga Zoo in Sydney.

Releasing balloons en masse into the sky to mark funerals and other ceremonies is killing birds, say scientists who have called for the practice to be banned.

"Balloons are a huge threat, not only to birds, but turtles and other marine life," said Fiona Maxwell, campaigner with the Australian Marine Conservation Society.

Renowned wildlife illustrator William T. Cooper was once described by Sir David Attenborough as the best ornithological illustrator alive.

The artist, known to his friends as Bill, was even the subject of one of Sir David's films, Portrait Painter to the Birds.

Mr Cooper, 81, died at his home at Malanda, south-west of Cairns, in far north Queensland on Sunday afternoon.

That ability to conquer natural bird populations could be increasing rapidly thanks to genes passed down through generations via natural selection.

Australian Museum principal research scientists Dr Richard Major explained yesterday that common mynas (often referred to as Indian mynas) arrived in Australia in the mid-1800s, but only really started to thrive from about 1975.

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