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They were once seen in flocks of thousands. Now no more than 500 cover an area from central Queensland to southern Victoria. The Regent Honeyeater is one step away from extinction. Matthew Crawford joins a team in NE Victoria releasing birds following a successful captive breeding program at Taronga Zoo in Sydney.

Releasing balloons en masse into the sky to mark funerals and other ceremonies is killing birds, say scientists who have called for the practice to be banned.

"Balloons are a huge threat, not only to birds, but turtles and other marine life," said Fiona Maxwell, campaigner with the Australian Marine Conservation Society.

Renowned wildlife illustrator William T. Cooper was once described by Sir David Attenborough as the best ornithological illustrator alive.

The artist, known to his friends as Bill, was even the subject of one of Sir David's films, Portrait Painter to the Birds.

Mr Cooper, 81, died at his home at Malanda, south-west of Cairns, in far north Queensland on Sunday afternoon.

That ability to conquer natural bird populations could be increasing rapidly thanks to genes passed down through generations via natural selection.

Australian Museum principal research scientists Dr Richard Major explained yesterday that common mynas (often referred to as Indian mynas) arrived in Australia in the mid-1800s, but only really started to thrive from about 1975.

DOZENS of tiny birds met a sad death when a careless Peregian homeowner poured a sticky gel around their property in an effort to deter larger birds from roosting.  

The wild population of Regent Honeyeaters will swell by 20% this week when Taronga Zoo releases 77 of the critically endangered birds produced through its breeding program.

Distinctive for its embroidered yellow plumage, the honeyeater is considered a “flagship” species: the most marketable of a group of endangered animals that share a habitat.

With easy pickings of fruit, berries, nuts, bulbs and seed in Canberra, cockatoos and corellas have plenty of time left to play, a hallmark of their intelligence, according to avian experts.

The swift parrot, Australia's fastest nectar-eater, is suffering such a catastrophic population decline that conservationist biologists are pushing for the brightly-coloured bird to be urgently listed as critically endangered.

A fashion relic of the late eighties and nineties, the humble scrunchie has found a new lease on life preventing the slaughter of wildlife by domestic cats.

In a new study, West Australian researchers found putting a scrunchie-like collar on cats reduced the amount of native wildlife killed by more than half.

The toxic cane toad introduced to Australia in the 1930s is causing ripples through the ecosystem in ways rarely seen when invasive species spread.

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