Australian Logrunner

Did you know?

Logrunners have a spiny tail that they use as a brace when they forage in the leaf-litter.

Calls
The Logrunner has a loud, far-carrying call that sounds like 'be-kweek-kweek-kweek-kweek'.
Facts and Figures
Research Species: 
No
Minimum Size: 
18cm
Maximum Size: 
20cm
Average size: 
19cm
Average weight: 
63g
Breeding season: 
June to September
Clutch Size: 
1 to 3
Incubation: 
25 days
Nestling Period: 
18 days
Conservation Status
Federal: 
NSW: 
QLD: 
Basic Information
Scientific Name: 
Featured bird groups: 
Atlas Number: 
434
What does it look like?
Description: 

The Logrunner is a small, robust, ground-dwelling bird, with a short and sturdy bill. The short wings are rounded and the short, broad tail has obvious spines at the end. Adult male birds have a grey face and sides, and are white underneath, olive-rufous above, with grey bars across the wing. Adult females are similar, but have a orange-rufous throat. Immature birds are similar to adults, but the underparts are mottled with white. Their legs and feet are sturdy and powerful. They walk away when disturbed, seldom flying far on whirring wings. The Logrunner is also known as the Spinetailed Logrunner.

Where does it live?
Distribution: 

The Logrunner is found on the east coast of New South Wales and Queensland, from near Canberra to north of Brisbane. It is uncommon in southern New South Wales.

Habitat: 

The Logrunner occurs in wet eucalypt forest, sub-tropical and tropical rainforests with a dense canopy and understorey, and an accumulation of leaf litter.

Seasonal movements: 

The Logrunner feeds on invertebrates. They forage on the ground, usually singly, in pairs or small family parties, scratching with their large, strong feet through the leaf litter, using their tail as a prop. They leave a trail of small cleared circles behind them as they feed.

What does it do?
Feeding: 

The Logrunner feeds on invertebrates. They forage on the ground, usually singly, in pairs or small family parties, scratching with their large, strong feet through the leaf litter, using their tail as a prop. They leave a trail of small cleared circles behind them as they feed.

Breeding: 

The Logrunner builds a dome-shaped nest, with a side entrance opening at ground level, made from leaves, twigs, moss, wood and tree ferns, often covered by leaf litter and other debris. It is thick enough to stay dry inside during heavy downpours. The nest is usually found on the ground, on a gently sloping bank of a creek. The Logrunner may also choose to build the nest above ground in dense vegetation. The female builds the nest and incubates the eggs alone, and feeds the young with food brought by the male.

Living with us

The Logrunner has been adversely affected by land clearance and modification of its habitat.

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